Cooking Japanese – Real Taste of Home Healthy Cookbook Recipes

Nowadays every one loves eating Japanese food. They seems to have a fascination with Japanese food, the way it is prepared into small little bite sized sushi, delicious grilled teriyaki, fresh salmon or cod fish in sashimi, the humble miso soup and soba noodles are jam-packed with nutrition and bursting with vitamins and minerals! The […]

Nowadays every one loves eating Japanese food. They seems to have a fascination with Japanese food, the way it is prepared into small little bite sized sushi, delicious grilled teriyaki, fresh salmon or cod fish in sashimi, the humble miso soup and soba noodles are jam-packed with nutrition and bursting with vitamins and minerals! The salmon and cod fish is high in omega 3, which is great for lowering cholesterol levels for a healthy heart. They provide the most optimum nutrition that our body daily needs. Every single dish is an art form packed with nutrition. It's simply ingenious!

The beautiful presentation and well-arrangement in Japanese food and the distinct taste of home recipes always fulfill one's appetite. However, eating out in Japanese restaurants does take a big chunk out of our budget. Cooking Japanese dishes by yourself is another alternative to save some money in the mean time to enjoy the real Japanese taste recipes from your own home.

Below are some Japanese taste of home healthy cookbook recipes which will definitely let you and your family enjoy a luxurious yet affordable dinner:

Tofu Dengaku
Japanese have a long history of eating miso-topped tofu. This nutritious dish came to be called dengaku, named for the wooden skewers on which it was sometimes cooked. These long skewers were reminiscent of the stilts worn in an ancient dance of the same name.

Making this dish is easy. First wrap the tofu with a clean dish towel. Put two plates on top of tofu leave aside to extract any excess moisture. Meanwhile, combine the 100g miso, 1 egg york, 2 teaspoons dashi, 2 teaspoons mirin and 2 teaspoons sugar in a bowl. Whisk until smooth. Preheat the grill, lightly brush the tofu blocks with little vegetables oil and grill until lightly brown. Thickly spread the miso mixture onto one side and sit under the grill again, miso side up for a few minutes or golden in color. Sprinkled with some sesame seeds and serve immediately.

Sake-glazed Salmon
Both savory and sweet often mingle in Japanese cuisine. These tender and juicy salmon slices are served with a lightly sweetened soy sauce and butter glazed. Usually serve with a vegetable side dish and a bowl of hot steamed rice.

You will need to have 500g salmon fillets lightly season with salt. Heat the oils in a frying pan and cook the salmon pieces with skin side down over medium-high heat. Cook about 3 minutes and reduce the heat to medium. Turn fish over and cook for further 2 – 3 minutes. Be careful not to overcooked the salmon. Remove the salmon from the pan, cover and set aside. Remove any excess oil from the frying pan, mix in butter, sake, soy sauce, mirin, sugar and ginger to the pan. Increase the heat and stir to dissolve the sugar. Bring to a boil and cook, stirring until slightly thickened. Drizzle the glaze over salmon.