Raccoon Stuffed Animal

Like the real thing, a raccoon stuffed animal is adorable to look at, but, unlike the real thing, it’s never vicious and wouldn’t ever think of harming you. Raccoons are a wild animal that are best left to their own devices, without any human intervention, but a raccoon stuffed animal needs loads of love and attention.

While it’s true that watching a raccoon family is a terrific sneak peek into the wild, the fact of the matter is, these animals can and often do come into conflict with owners of property and residents. There are six species of raccoons, plus the more familiar North American one. They can be found living in forests, prairies, marshes, and even urban areas. They are omnivores and eat insects, small rodents and other small animals, eggs, fruit (such as grapes), vegetable (like corn) and nuts. With their very quick paws, in the wild, much of their food comes from the water where they catch frogs, crayfish, and other types of aquatic creatures. They will also dine on garbage and composts in urban areas. Essentially, they will eat just about anything they find. With the use of their skillful and competent front paws and long fingers in which they are able to pry things open (like garbage can lids) and even turn knobs, they can quite easily feed on anything they want. Once they find a free meal, they will keep coming back again and again. In urban settings they are quite fond of gardens and lawns, especially after a good rainfall. At that time, both larvae and grubs come near the surface and raccoons will dig small holes (and even roll up chunks of sod) to get at them.

Raccoons are mostly active at night throughout much of the year, although through periods of long cold snaps or deep snow conditions, they may lie dormant. Their dens include chimney’s, attics, hollow trees, groundhog dens, garages, porches, and under decks. While it’s preferable that they stay in the wild, that’s not always the case. Loose shingles on a roof, openings in attics, garages, sheds, and uncapped chimney’s, are all open invitations for raccoons to make a den. They can (and will) tear off shingles and chew holes in buildings. Removal of these and other wildlife are always best left to the experts such as commercial wildlife removal companies.

Luckily for you, a raccoon stuffed animal poses no threat to your home – it will sit or lie quietly on a shelf, a bed, or perched on a pillow, until such time as it’s needed. In addition, the food habits of the real thing aren’t a consideration for a raccoon stuffed animal which means it won’t be digging anything up in your garden or garbage diving inside a bin, anytime soon.

Copyright Shelley Vassall, 2010.